Tag Archives: economy

Political Cartoon of the Week – April 30, 2022

Joe Heller

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Best Quote of the Week – April 9, 2022

“I think — you know, a lot of my friends are registered Republicans living out there.  They think that too.  I mean, it’s just so outrageous.  That $2 trillion tax cut, the last guy — what was his name?  Anyway, the last guy…I forgot it.  He never showed up for the inauguration, but anyway.”

President Joe Biden, at North America’s Building Trades Unions Legislative Conference

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Best Quote of the Week – March 5, 2022

“Despite the incredible heroism of Ukraine’s people, it’s still more likely than not that the Russian flag will eventually be planted amid the rubble of Kyiv and Kharkiv. But even if that happens, the Russian Federation will be left weaker and poorer than it was before the invasion. Conquest doesn’t pay.”

Paul Krugman, commenting on the economic impact of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

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Best Quotes of the Week – May 22, 2021

“Holy crap.  Perhaps a U.S. Senator shouldn’t suggest that the Russian military is better than the American military that protected him from an insurrection he helped foment?”

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, responding to a Tweet by Sen. Ted Cruz criticizing the U.S. military’s diversity endeavors

“We can’t even imagine the thinking behind Gov. Abbott’s callous decision to strip the remaining federal unemployment insurance benefits out of the pockets of Texas working families.  If he took the time or had any interest in understanding the challenges working people face, Gov. Abbott would see clearly that folks across Texas desperately need these funds as they try to navigate their way through the economic carnage of the pandemic.”

Rick Levy, president of the Texas AFL-CIO, reacting to Gov. Abbott’s decision to opt out of federal unemployment benefits extensions

“The Big Pharma fairy tale is one of groundbreaking R&D that justifies astronomical prices.  But the pharma reality is that you spend most of your company’s money making money for yourself and your shareholders.”

Rep. Katie Porter, to Richard Gonzalez, CEO of pharmaceutical giant AbbVie, about increasingly high costs for prescription drugs

During the U.S. House Oversight Committee hearing, Porter also declared, “You lie to patients when you charge them twice as much for an unimproved drug, and then you lie to policymakers when you tell us that R&D justifies those price increases.”

Gonzalez’s 2020 total compensation topped USD 24 million.

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Best Quotes of the Week – March 6, 2021

“Abbott has purposefully injected a new infection into the state in the form of irresponsible policies that will promote unnecessary infection, hospitalization and death.”

Dr. Kavita Patel, on the announcement by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to reopen the state 100% to retailers, restaurants and other businesses, despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

“The Republican Party’s biggest problem is that too many people of color are exercising their right to vote.  The party’s solution is a massive push for voter suppression that would make old-time Jim Crow segregationists proud.”

Eugene Robinson, in a Washington Post editorial

“I think a lot of us assumed that we were the dominant gene – if only because the country was changing so much – that out of its own self-interest the party would have to change.  We saw the dark side.  We thought it was a recessive gene.  And I don’t know any conclusion to come to except that we were wrong.”

Stuart Stevens, on MSNBC’s “The 11th Hour with Brian Williams” 03/03/21

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Tweet of the Week – January 30, 2021

Kylie Brakeman

President Joe Biden’s $15-an-Hour Minimum-Wage Plan

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Best Quotes of the Week – January 23, 2021

“This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge.  Unity is the path forward. And we must meet this moment as the United States of America. If we do that, I guarantee you we will not fail.”

President Joe Biden, in his inaugural address

“The idea that you can get up here and … let the science speak, it is somewhat of a liberating feeling.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, speaking about the COVID-19 pandemic during a White House press conference

“We cut taxes for $5 trillion, almost all of it to the wealthiest people in America.  And we borrowed every penny to do that.”

Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO), criticizing the sudden concern about the U.S. budget deficit by his Republican colleagues during a U.S. Senate hearing

Bennet added that “we’ve made some poor choices in terms of what we’ve borrowed money to spend on.  Two wars in the Middle East that lasted for 20 years that cost us something like $5.6 trillion, all of which was borrowed, none of which was paid for.”

“Opine all you like, but if you’re going to opine, begin with the truth and opine from there.  When people begin with a false premise and lead people astray, that’s injurious to society and it’s the antithesis of what we should be doing: Those of us who are so honored and grateful to have a platform of public influence have to use it for the public good.”

Shephard Smith, former FOX News host and current CNBC anchor, on why he left FOX

Smith also revealed that he stayed at Fox News from its 1996 inception until 2019 to act as a counterbalance to the network’s right-wing leanings.

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Angriest Quote of the Week – December 19, 2020

“Millions of Americans are struggling during what should be a joyous time of year, yet Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is holding COVID-19 relief hostage. His ransom? Total immunity for corporations that recklessly endanger consumers and workers during the pandemic.

For months, McConnell has insisted that Congress take action to protect corporations alleged to engage in wrongdoing.

For months, McConnell has insisted that Congress should take action to protect corporations that are alleged to engage in wrongdoing and endanger their employees, consumers and patients. Companies that don’t provide protective equipment or mandate physical distancing in the workplace, for example, would face no civil liability when their workers become sick.

Even as Americans go hungry and confront homelessness, McConnell is trying to leverage the coronavirus emergency to greenlight corporate abuse, instead of helping vulnerable families.

Worse, he is lying to the American people about his motivation, claiming that an “epidemic” of coronavirus-related lawsuits must be addressed. The actual epidemic, of course, is COVID-19, taking thousands of lives every day and sickening the very workers businesses depend on for their profits.”

 – Rep. Katie Porter, in a video essay on December 15

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Video of the Week – November 28, 2020

There’s something about the dignity and formality of elected officials disintegrating when tensions explode into chaos and madness.  Such was the scene on Friday, November 27, when lawmakers in Taiwan got into fist fights and threw pig entrails at each other over a soon-to-be enacted policy that would allow imports of U.S. pork and beef.  Premier Su Tseng-Chang was due to give a regularly scheduled policy report to lawmakers on Friday morning about the pork policy when opposition party lawmakers from the Nationalist party, also known as the KMT, blocked his attempt to speak by dumping bags of pig organs.  Legislators from the ruling Democratic Progressive Party attempted to stop them, resulting in the brawl.

This may be a Y chromosome thing, Dear Readers, but I’d almost like to see something similar in either chamber of the U.S. Congress.  Minus the pig parts, of course.  I mean, what a waste!

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A 2020

I know I’m not alone in wishing this year a speedy demise.  It certainly can’t end soon enough.  On January 1, I personally felt I was at the precipice of a new beginning.  I planned to finish and publish my second novel; a minor accomplishment that didn’t materialize last year.  I also hoped to work towards upgrading my house.  My father’s fetish for candles many years ago left soot marks throughout most every room.  I also wanted to plant a couple of trees in the front yard.  All sorts of good things loomed across the horizon!  But, if you want to see the Great Creator’s sense of irony, announce your plans for the future.

At the end of January, my mother suffered a stroke; one bad enough to render her left side almost completely immobile.  I had to admit her to a rehabilitation center and almost felt like I was abandoning her.  She made good progress and started to regain movement on her left side, especially her arm.  Then her Medicare benefits ran out, and the center had to discharge her.  Basically they evicted her because she didn’t have enough money.  So she returned home and went on hospice care.  She passed away in June.

By then, however, the COVID-19 pandemic had hit, and the economy starting tanking.  As my mother’s health deteriorated here at the house, I also fell ill and thought I’d contracted the C plague.  Nasty visions of me lying in bed gasping for air, while my mother wilted in her own bed and hospice nurses tried getting into the house, burdened my days and nights.  One morning local firefighters ambushed my front door with loud bangs.  They’d been told a COVID victim might be trapped inside.  A man stood on the porch with a heavy tool designed to breach everything from storm doors to bad attitudes.

After my mother died, I learned she had no beneficiary payouts from her two pension funds.  Like so many Americans, I was unemployed and exhausting what funds I’d garnered from previous work.  I couldn’t qualify for unemployment insurance, and no stimulus money was headed my way.  I had to borrow money to pay basic utilities.  Then I did receive money from an insurance policy I didn’t know existed.  That became the brightest spot in my dismal life so far.

I’ve stabilized myself now, even as I remain jobless with minimal prospects.  More importantly, I know I’m not alone in my feelings of despair and loneliness.

The U.S. is still mired in the depths of the most cantankerous presidential election in decades.  The pandemic shows no signs of abating.  And the economy remains brittle.  Adding to the agony is that the Atlantic / Caribbean hurricane season just won’t quit.  Even though it’s technically scheduled to cease on November 30, tell that to nature.  Some fools tried that with the pandemic – ordering it to end by X date – and the scourge replied with a middle finger.

Such is 2020.  Everything that could go wrong this year has gone wrong.  We’ve reached the point, nevertheless, that any kind of mishap is answered with, ‘It’s 2020.’

The number 2020 is supposed to signify perfect vision.  And, at this moment, we’ve seen how perfectly screwed up things can get.  Thus, in the future, perhaps for generations to come, any crisis will be dubbed ‘A 2020’.

Had a bad day at work or school?  Just tell people it was a 2020.

A rough trip through the airport?  A 2020 escapade.

Burned food in the oven?  You made a 2020.

How was it with your in-laws over?  It was so 2020.

You get the message.  Now, on to New Year’s!

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