Tag Archives: thesaurus

Word of the Week – January 30, 2021

Pollicitation

Noun

Late Middle English

The action of promising; a promise; a document conveying a promise.  In civil law, a promise not yet formally accepted, and therefore in certain cases revocable.

Example: I love to hear whatever pollicitation our elected officials spit out during their campaigns.

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Word of the Week – January 16, 2021

Tohubohu

Noun

Hebrew, unknown origin

A state of chaos; utter confusion.

Example:  After the tohubohu of this past week, I need some good music and great wine.

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Word of the Week – January 9, 2021

Prospicience

Noun

Latin, 15th century

The action of looking forward; foresight.

Example:  Despite anxiety over this week’s chaos, my prospicience always compels me to be optimistic.

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Word of the Week – December 19, 2020

Blatherskite

Noun

Scottish English, 17th century

Nonsense

A person who is prone to speaking nonsense

Example:  I occasionally watch the talking heads on right-wing TV and can only think: what a pathetic blatherskite!

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Word of the Week – December 12, 2020

Absquatulate

Verb

American English, 1830s

To flee. To take off with somebody or something.

Example:  As 2020 comes to an end, I only want to absquatulate with my books and writings.

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Word of the Week – December 5, 2020

Emulous

Adjective

Latin, mid-16th century

Seeking to emulate someone or something.

Motivated by a spirit of rivalry.

Example: My rationale is emulous of the great thinkers of the ancient world because I don’t spend much time on social media.

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Word of the Week – November 28, 2020

Prospicience

Noun

Latin, late 15th century

The action of looking forward. Foresight.

Example: With my usual prospicience, I see good things for my writing career in 2021.

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