Tag Archives: words

Word of the Week – May 1, 2021

Irrefragable

Adjective

Latin, 16th century

Not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable.

Example: It’s irrefragable that conservative trickle-down economics is not economically productive.

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Word of the Week – April 24, 2021

Entelechy

Noun

Middle English, late 1500s

The supposed vital principle that guides the development and functioning of an organism or other system or organization. (Philosophy) The realization of potential.

Example: After years of self-doubt, I came to appreciate my own entelechy and could move forward.

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Word of the Week – April 17, 2021

Heuristic

Adjective

Greek, 19th century

Enabling a person to discover or learn something for themselves. A heuristic process or method.

Example: A college English instructor’s heuristic approach to literature prompted me to become a better writer.

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Word of the Week – April 10, 2021

Obnubilate

Verb

Latin, 16th century

Darken, dim, or cover with or as if with a cloud; obscure

Example: Anxiety began to obnubilate my sense of self-worth, but reading and writing snuffed it out.

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Word of the Week – April 3, 2021

Effloresce

Verb

Latin, 18th century

Reach an optimum stage of development; blossom; (of a substance) lose moisture and turn to a fine powder on exposure to air.

Example:  Even at this age, I know my writing career has yet to effloresce.

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Word of the Week – March 27, 2021

Antediluvian

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Absurdly outmoded or old-fashioned.  Of or relating to a time before the biblical flood.

Example: Like 8-track tape players and dial phones, the political process in Washington seems so antediluvian.

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Word of the Week – March 20, 2021

Pleonasm

Noun

Greek, 16th century

The use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning, either as a fault of style or for emphasis.

Example:  My tendency towards pleonasm always arises when I talk about my writing projects.

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Word of the Week – March 13, 2021

Ethos

Noun

Latin, 19th century

The characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.

Example:  I sense the ethos fomenting in America right now is as progressive and as it is hopeful.

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Word of the Week – March 6, 2021

Epexegesis

Noun

Greek, 16th century

The addition of words to clarify meaning. Words added for the purpose of clarifying meaning.

Example: In speaking to hard-right conservatives, I often have to engage in epexegesis to get my point across.

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Word of the Week – February 27, 2021

Charivari

Noun

French, 17th century

A noisy mock serenade performed by a group of people to celebrate a marriage or mock an unpopular person. A series of discordant noises.

Example: Watching the charivari of conservatives in Orlando reminds me of the Saturday morning cartoons of my childhood.

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