Tag Archives: thesaurus

Word of the Week – April 10, 2021

Obnubilate

Verb

Latin, 16th century

Darken, dim, or cover with or as if with a cloud; obscure

Example: Anxiety began to obnubilate my sense of self-worth, but reading and writing snuffed it out.

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Word of the Week – April 3, 2021

Effloresce

Verb

Latin, 18th century

Reach an optimum stage of development; blossom; (of a substance) lose moisture and turn to a fine powder on exposure to air.

Example:  Even at this age, I know my writing career has yet to effloresce.

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Word of the Week – March 27, 2021

Antediluvian

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Absurdly outmoded or old-fashioned.  Of or relating to a time before the biblical flood.

Example: Like 8-track tape players and dial phones, the political process in Washington seems so antediluvian.

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Word of the Week – March 20, 2021

Pleonasm

Noun

Greek, 16th century

The use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning, either as a fault of style or for emphasis.

Example:  My tendency towards pleonasm always arises when I talk about my writing projects.

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Word of the Week – March 13, 2021

Ethos

Noun

Latin, 19th century

The characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.

Example:  I sense the ethos fomenting in America right now is as progressive and as it is hopeful.

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Word of the Week – March 6, 2021

Epexegesis

Noun

Greek, 16th century

The addition of words to clarify meaning. Words added for the purpose of clarifying meaning.

Example: In speaking to hard-right conservatives, I often have to engage in epexegesis to get my point across.

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Word of the Week – February 27, 2021

Charivari

Noun

French, 17th century

A noisy mock serenade performed by a group of people to celebrate a marriage or mock an unpopular person. A series of discordant noises.

Example: Watching the charivari of conservatives in Orlando reminds me of the Saturday morning cartoons of my childhood.

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Word of the Week – February 20, 2021

Stochastic

Adjective

Greek, 17th century

Randomly determined; having a random probability distribution or pattern that may be analyzed statistically but may not be predicted precisely.

Example: State officials’ response to the ice storm proved they only have stochastic viewpoints.

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Word of the Week – February 13, 2021

Lagom

Noun

Swedish, early 19th century

The principle of living a balanced, moderately paced, low-fuss life.

Example: My personal lagom includes reading, writing, eating healthy and not spending too much time on social media.

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Word of the Week – February 6, 2021

Ratiocinate

Verb

Latin, 17th century

Form judgments by a process of logic. Reason.

Example: I looked at my financial situation and had to ratiocinate what is most important right now.

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