Tag Archives: literature

Word of the Week – June 19, 2021

Irrefragable

Adjective

Latin, 16th century

Not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable.

Example: Voting is an irrefragable right to any democratic society.

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Retro Quote – James Baldwin

“One writes out of one thing only – one’s own experience. Everything depends on how relentlessly one forces from this experience the last drop, sweet or bitter, it can possibly give. This is the only real concern of the artist, to recreate out of the disorder of life that order which is art.”

James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son

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Word of the Week – June 12, 2021

Epigrammatic

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Of the nature or in the style of an epigram; concise, clever, and amusing.

Example: Whether composing short stories or essays, I often rely upon my epigrammatic personality to get my point across.

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Word of the Week – May 29, 2021

Clerisy

Noun

German, 19th century

A distinct class of learned or literary people.

Example: I generally write essays and stories for the clerisy of the world.

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Word of the Week – May 22, 2021

Redivivus

Adjective

Origin: Latin, late 16th century

Come back to life; reborn.

Example: After an hour of exercise, writing in my journal, and a night of solid sleep, I felt a redivivus of my soul.

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Word of the Week – April 17, 2021

Heuristic

Adjective

Greek, 19th century

Enabling a person to discover or learn something for themselves. A heuristic process or method.

Example: A college English instructor’s heuristic approach to literature prompted me to become a better writer.

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Word of the Week – April 3, 2021

Effloresce

Verb

Latin, 18th century

Reach an optimum stage of development; blossom; (of a substance) lose moisture and turn to a fine powder on exposure to air.

Example:  Even at this age, I know my writing career has yet to effloresce.

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Word of the Week – March 27, 2021

Antediluvian

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Absurdly outmoded or old-fashioned.  Of or relating to a time before the biblical flood.

Example: Like 8-track tape players and dial phones, the political process in Washington seems so antediluvian.

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In Memoriam – Larry McMurtry, 1936-2021

“You expect far too much of a first sentence. Think of it as analagous to a good country breakfast: what we want is something simple, but nourishing to the imagination. Hold the philosophy, hold the adjectives, just give us a plain subject and verb and perhaps a wholesome, nonfattening adverb or two.”

Larry McMurtry

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In Memoriam – Beverly Cleary, 1916-2021

“Children should learn that reading is pleasure, not just something that teachers make you do in school.”

Beverly Cleary

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