Tag Archives: literature

October 2022 Literary Calendar

Events in the month of October for writers and readers

  • National Book Month
  • National Reading Group Month
  • October 1 – International Coffee Day
  • October 2 – Name Your Car Day
  • October 3 – Techies Day
  • October 7 – World Smile Day
  • October 6 – Mad Hatter Day
  • October 9 – Curious Events Day
  • October 10 – Indigenous People’s Day
  • October 11 – Myth and Legends Day; National Coming Out Day
  • October 12 – Cookbook Launch Day; Moment of Frustration Day
  • October 13 – International Skeptic’s Day
  • October 15 – Mario Puzo’s Birthday
  • October 16 – Noah Webster’s Birthday; Oscar Wilde’s Birthday; Dictionary Day
  • October 16-22 – National Friends of Libraries Week
  • October 19 – Evaluate Your Life Day
  • October 20 – National Day on Writing
  • October 21 – Alfred Nobel’s Birthday; Babbling Day
  • October 22 – Smart Is Cool Day
  • October 25 – Pablo Picasso’s Birthday; Howl at the Moon Night
  • October 27 – National Tell a Story Day (Scotland; U.K.)
  • October 29 – Hermit Day
  • October 31 – Increase Your Psychic Powers Day

Famous October Birthdays

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Banned Books Week 2022

I know I’m running late with this, but it’s Banned Books Week, the annual commemoration of free speech and free press.  As always, some people feel they have the authority to determine what the rest of us can see and read.  They start with the schools and libraries under the familiar guise of protecting the children, but the ultimate goal is to restrict literature and education.

All writers and bloggers should always stand up to any kind of censorship.  Remember, no one – absolutely no one – has the right to select what you can and cannot read!

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August 2022 Literary Calendar

Events in the month of August for writers and readers

  • Romance Awareness Month
  • August 2 – National Coloring Book Day
  • August 7 – Purple Heart Day
  • August 9 – Book Lover’s Day (also November 6)
  • August 18 – Bad Poetry Day
  • August 21 – Poet’s Day
  • August 31 – We Love Memoirs Day

Famous August Birthdays

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Word of the Week – July 2, 2022

Trenchant

[TREN-chənt]

Adjective

Middle English, 13th century

Being sharp, intense, and forceful. Characterized by energy and effectiveness

Trenchant is often used to describe commentary or criticism. If you have a trenchant delivery, you’re known for your biting wit. An obsolete definition of trenchant means physically having a sharp blade. While the adjective is now used in a more figurative sense, a powerful, trenchant remark can still leave wounds.

Example: My trenchant descriptions of U.S. politics alienates some people, but excites others.

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July 2022 Literary Calendar

Events in the month of July for writers and readers

  • July 1 – Canada Day / International Joke Day
  • July 2 – I Forgot Day / World UFO Day
  • July 3 – Compliment Your Mirror Day / Disobedience Day
  • July 4 – Independence Day (U.S.) / National Country Music Day
  • July 5 – National Apple Turnover Day / National Bikini Day / National Workaholics Day
  • July 6 – International Kissing Day / National Fried Chicken Day
  • July 7 – Chocolate Day / Global Forgiveness Day
  • July 8 – National Blueberry Day / National Motorcycle Day (2nd Friday in July)
  • July 9 – National Sugar Cookie Day
  • July 10 – Teddy Bear Picnic Day
  • July 11 – Cheer Up the Lonely Day / National Blueberry Muffin Day / World Population Day
  • July 12 – Pecan Pie Day / National Different Colored Eyes Day
  • July 13 – Barbershop Music Appreciation Day / National French Fry Day
  • July 13 – Embrace Your Geekness Day
  • July 14 – Bastille Day / National Macaroni and Cheese Day / National Nude Day / Shark Awareness Day
  • July 15 – Be a Dork Day / Cow Appreciation Day / National Give Something Away Day
  • July 17 – National Ice Cream Day
  • July 20 – Moon Day
  • July 21 – National Be Somebody Day
  • July 22 – Hammock Day
  • July 23 – National Day of the Cowboy / Vanilla Ice Cream Day
  • July 24 – Amelia Earhart Day / Cousins Day / National Tequila Day / Parents’ Day
  • July 26 – All or Nothing Day
  • July 27 – Walk on Stilts Day
  • July 29 – International Tiger Day
  • July 30 – International Day of Friendship
  • July 31 – Mutt’s Day / National Avocado Day

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Word of the Week – June 25, 2022

Ratiocinate

[rash-ee-OH-sin-ate]

Verb

Latin, 17th century

Form judgments by a process of logic. Reason.

This word comes from the Latin word “ratiocinat,” which means “deliberated; calculated.”  To ratiocinate, you must develop your critical and logical thinking skills.

Example: In working through my science fiction novel, I have to ratiocinate through the menagerie of characters and situations I’ve created.

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Word of the Week – June 18, 2022

Esemplastic

[es-em-PLAS-tik]

Adjective

Greek, early 19th century

Molding into one; unifying.

While constructed from Greek root, this word was coined by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, likely from the German “ineinsbildung,” meaning “forming into one.” The word “esemplastic” can be traced back to a singular source: English poet and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In his 1817 autobiography, “Biographia Literaria,” he formed the word by combining the Greek phrase “es hen,” meaning “into one,” with “plastic.” This fulfilled his desire for a term that depicted the imagination’s ability to meld vastly different experiences into a unified form — such as crafting various sensations, images, and experiences into a poem.

Example: I always try to relay my work experience to potential employers in an esemplastic manner.

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Tweet of the Week – June 18, 2022

Harry Litman

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Word of the Week – June 11, 2022

Eudaemonism

[yoo-DEE-mə-niz-əm]

Noun

Greek, early 19th century

A system of ethics that bases moral value on the likelihood of actions producing happiness.

“Eudaemonism” entered English in the 19th century from the Greek “εὐδαιμονία,” meaning happiness, with the suffix “-ism” to indicate a system of belief or practice.  “Eudaemonism” is based on the Greek term “eudaemonia,” introduced by Aristotle.  Aristotle’s “eudaemonia” described the positive condition of doing and living well.  It was not, in fact, a synonym for happiness, but rather it described a greater state of positive existence, which combined wisdom, contemplation, virtue, and other beneficial attributes for personal success.

Example: Through all the anxiety and drama, I detected a true sense of eudaemonism in viewing the opening session of the January 6 Committee hearings.

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Word of the Week – June 4, 2022

Conspectus

[kən-SPEK-təs]

Noun

Latin, 1830s

A summary or overview of a subject.

This word stems from the Latin “conspectus,” meaning a “looking at, sight, view; range or power of vision.” It is the noun use of the past participle of “conspicere,” meaning “to look at”, which originates from “specere,” meaning “to look at”.  “Conspectus” sounds like another word that’s more common in modern English: “prospectus.” They also share a Latin root, “specere,” which means “to look at.” But while “conspectus” means an overview of a particular subject, a “prospectus” is “a printed document that advertises or describes a school, commercial enterprise, forthcoming book, etc., in order to attract or inform clients, members, buyers, or investors.”

Example: A conspectus of my work experience helped solidify my credentials for the engineering company.

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