Tag Archives: literature

Word of the Week – June 25, 2022

Ratiocinate

[rash-ee-OH-sin-ate]

Verb

Latin, 17th century

Form judgments by a process of logic. Reason.

This word comes from the Latin word “ratiocinat,” which means “deliberated; calculated.”  To ratiocinate, you must develop your critical and logical thinking skills.

Example: In working through my science fiction novel, I have to ratiocinate through the menagerie of characters and situations I’ve created.

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Word of the Week – June 18, 2022

Esemplastic

[es-em-PLAS-tik]

Adjective

Greek, early 19th century

Molding into one; unifying.

While constructed from Greek root, this word was coined by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, likely from the German “ineinsbildung,” meaning “forming into one.” The word “esemplastic” can be traced back to a singular source: English poet and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In his 1817 autobiography, “Biographia Literaria,” he formed the word by combining the Greek phrase “es hen,” meaning “into one,” with “plastic.” This fulfilled his desire for a term that depicted the imagination’s ability to meld vastly different experiences into a unified form — such as crafting various sensations, images, and experiences into a poem.

Example: I always try to relay my work experience to potential employers in an esemplastic manner.

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Tweet of the Week – June 18, 2022

Harry Litman

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Word of the Week – June 11, 2022

Eudaemonism

[yoo-DEE-mə-niz-əm]

Noun

Greek, early 19th century

A system of ethics that bases moral value on the likelihood of actions producing happiness.

“Eudaemonism” entered English in the 19th century from the Greek “εὐδαιμονία,” meaning happiness, with the suffix “-ism” to indicate a system of belief or practice.  “Eudaemonism” is based on the Greek term “eudaemonia,” introduced by Aristotle.  Aristotle’s “eudaemonia” described the positive condition of doing and living well.  It was not, in fact, a synonym for happiness, but rather it described a greater state of positive existence, which combined wisdom, contemplation, virtue, and other beneficial attributes for personal success.

Example: Through all the anxiety and drama, I detected a true sense of eudaemonism in viewing the opening session of the January 6 Committee hearings.

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Word of the Week – June 4, 2022

Conspectus

[kən-SPEK-təs]

Noun

Latin, 1830s

A summary or overview of a subject.

This word stems from the Latin “conspectus,” meaning a “looking at, sight, view; range or power of vision.” It is the noun use of the past participle of “conspicere,” meaning “to look at”, which originates from “specere,” meaning “to look at”.  “Conspectus” sounds like another word that’s more common in modern English: “prospectus.” They also share a Latin root, “specere,” which means “to look at.” But while “conspectus” means an overview of a particular subject, a “prospectus” is “a printed document that advertises or describes a school, commercial enterprise, forthcoming book, etc., in order to attract or inform clients, members, buyers, or investors.”

Example: A conspectus of my work experience helped solidify my credentials for the engineering company.

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June 2022 Literary Calendar

Events in the month of June for writers and readers

Audiobook Appreciation Month

GLBT Book Month

  • June 1 – Global Day of Parents; Global Running Day; National Pen Pal Day; National Say Something Nice Day; World Reef Awareness Day
  • June 3 – National Egg Day
  • June 4 – National Cheese Day; National Hug Your Cat Day
  • June 5 – National Cancer Survivor’s Day; National Donut Day; National Gingerbread Day; World Environment Day
  • June 8 – National Best Friend’s Day; World Oceans Day
  • June 10 – Ball Point Pen Day
  • June 11 – Global Wellness Day
  • June 12 – Anne Frank’s Birthday
  • June 14 – Bourbon Day; World Blood Donor Day
  • June 15 – National Photography Day; World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
  • June 16 – Bloomsday (celebration of Irish writer James Joyce’s life); National Fudge Day
  • June 17 –  World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought
  • June 19 – Father’s Day (U.S.)
  • June 20 – World Refugee Day
  • June 21 – Summer Solstice (Northern Hemisphere); Winter Solstice (Southern Hemisphere)
  • June 22 – Octavia Butler’s Birthday; World Rainforest Day
  • June 23 – National Hydration Day; Typewriter patent awarded (1868)
  • June 25 – Eric Carle’s Birthday
  • June 27 – Helen Keller’s Birthday; National PTSD Awareness Day
  • June 29 – Hug Holiday; National Camera Day
  • June 30 – National Handshake Day; National Work from Home Day; World Social Media Day

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Word of the Week – May 28, 2022

Habile

[HA-bəl]

Adjective

Latin, 15th century

Deft; skillful.

In Latin, “habilis” means something is easily handled. The French word habile means skillful, and we kept that definition in Middle English as well.  Able is the more common word today, but habile remains a particularly skillful word.  In today’s parlance, you’re more likely to use the word able rather than habile.  The pronunciations are somewhat similar, and the meanings are close.  Able implies you have at least the basic ability to do something.  But to be habile is to be quite talented.

Example: I had to explain my habile approach to composing documentation for software development to the project manager.

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April 2022 Literary Calendar

Events in the month of April for writers and readers

D.E.A.R. (Drop Everything and Read) Month

National Poetry Month

School Library Month

  • 1 – Reading is Funny Day
  • 2 – International Children’s Book Day
  • 2 – National Children’s Picture Book Day
  • 2 – Hans Christian Anderson’s birthday
  • 3-9 – National Library Week
  • 4 – National School Librarian Day
  • 4 – Maya Angelou’s birthday
  • 5 – National Library Worker’s Day
  • 6 – National Library Outreach Day (formerly National Bookmobile Day)
  • 7 – Take Action for Libraries Day
  • 9 – National Unicorn Day
  • 12 – Drop Everything and Read (D.E.A.R.) Day
  • 12 – Beverly Cleary’s birthday
  • 13 – Scrabble Day
  • 14 – Celebrate Teen Literature Day
  • 15 – Rubber Eraser Day
  • 15 – World Art Day
  • 16 – National Librarian Day
  • 17 – International Haiku Poetry Day
  • 18 – Newspaper Columnists Day
  • 23 – William Shakespeare’s birthday
  • 23 – World Book and Copyright Day
  • 23 – World Book Night
  • 24 – U.S. Congress approved the Library of Congress
  • 27 – National Tell A Story Day
  • 28 – Harper Lee’s birthday
  • 28 – Great Poetry Reading Day
  • 30 – Independent Bookstore Day

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Word of the Week – March 12, 2022

Corybantic

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Wild; frenzied. Cybele, a goddess of nature from Greco-Roman mythology, had priests and attendants called “Corybants.” The term comes from the Greek “Korubantes.”

Example: Some of my stories appear corybantic upon initial reading, but there’s a reason behind the chaos.

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Word of the Week – March 5, 2022

Aporia

Noun

Latin, 16th century

An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory. (Rhetoric) the expression of doubt.  Stems from ​​late Latin via the Greek “aporos,” meaning “impassable”: “a-” means “without,” and “poros” means “passage.”

Example: The aporia in our office led to a complete restructuring of staff.

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