Tag Archives: dictionary

Word of the Week – January 22, 2022

Tsundoku (積ん読)

Noun

Japanese (slang), 19th century

Acquiring reading materials and letting them pile up without reading them.  It combines elements of tsunde-oku (積んでおく, to pile things up) and dokusho (読書, reading books). As currently written, the word combines the characters for “pile up” (積) and the character for “read” (読).

Example: My vast tsundoku looks overwhelming, but it’s still comforting to me.

Image: Ronnie Filyaw – Whomp!

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Word of the Week – January 15, 2022

Passim

Adverb

Latin, 17th century

Of allusions or references in a published work to be found at various places throughout the text.

Example: Hints of my family history are occasionally passim in my writings.

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Word of the Week – January 8, 2022

Dithyramb

Noun

Latin from Greek, early 17th century

A wild choral hymn of ancient Greece, especially one dedicated to Dionysus.

A passionate or inflated speech, poem, or other writing.

Example: My energetic dithyramb on the stupidity of trickle-down economics fell flat at the Ronald Reagan Glee Club meeting.

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Word of the Week – June 26, 2021

Inosculate

Verb

Latin, 17th century

Join by intertwining or fitting closely together.

Example: I often inosculate my dreams with my passion for writing to create unusual tales.

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Word of the Week – June 19, 2021

Irrefragable

Adjective

Latin, 16th century

Not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable.

Example: Voting is an irrefragable right to any democratic society.

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Word of the Week – June 12, 2021

Epigrammatic

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Of the nature or in the style of an epigram; concise, clever, and amusing.

Example: Whether composing short stories or essays, I often rely upon my epigrammatic personality to get my point across.

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Word of the Week – June 5, 2021

Perspicacious

Adjective

Latin, 17th century

Highly perceptive, keen. Discerning, shrewd

Example: My perspicacious nature showed up early in childhood when I began reading around the age of 2.

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Word of the Week – May 29, 2021

Clerisy

Noun

German, 19th century

A distinct class of learned or literary people.

Example: I generally write essays and stories for the clerisy of the world.

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Word of the Week – May 22, 2021

Redivivus

Adjective

Origin: Latin, late 16th century

Come back to life; reborn.

Example: After an hour of exercise, writing in my journal, and a night of solid sleep, I felt a redivivus of my soul.

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Word of the Week – May 15, 2021

Synecdoche

Noun

Late Middle English, 1350s

A figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or vice versa.

Example: My full name is Jorge Lazaro Alejandro De La Garza, but I often go by the synecdoche of “Chief Writing Wolf”.

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