Tag Archives: dictionary

Word of the Week – January 16, 2021

Tohubohu

Noun

Hebrew, unknown origin

A state of chaos; utter confusion.

Example:  After the tohubohu of this past week, I need some good music and great wine.

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Word of the Week – January 9, 2021

Prospicience

Noun

Latin, 15th century

The action of looking forward; foresight.

Example:  Despite anxiety over this week’s chaos, my prospicience always compels me to be optimistic.

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Word of the Week – December 19, 2020

Blatherskite

Noun

Scottish English, 17th century

Nonsense

A person who is prone to speaking nonsense

Example:  I occasionally watch the talking heads on right-wing TV and can only think: what a pathetic blatherskite!

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Word of the Week – December 12, 2020

Absquatulate

Verb

American English, 1830s

To flee. To take off with somebody or something.

Example:  As 2020 comes to an end, I only want to absquatulate with my books and writings.

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Word of the Week – December 5, 2020

Emulous

Adjective

Latin, mid-16th century

Seeking to emulate someone or something.

Motivated by a spirit of rivalry.

Example: My rationale is emulous of the great thinkers of the ancient world because I don’t spend much time on social media.

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Word of the Week – November 28, 2020

Prospicience

Noun

Latin, late 15th century

The action of looking forward. Foresight.

Example: With my usual prospicience, I see good things for my writing career in 2021.

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Word of the Week – November 21, 2020

Verisimilitude

Noun

Latin, 16th century

The appearance of truth or resembling reality.  Something that only appears to be true.

Example: My tendency towards verisimilitude made me laugh throughout the press conference.

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Word of the Week – November 14, 2020

Sempiternal

Adjective

Latin, 15th  century

Eternal and unchanging; everlasting.

Example: Despite this year’s political chaos, I have sempiternal faith in the decency of average citizens.

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Word of the Week – October 17, 2020

Organon

Noun

Greek, late 16th century

1. A tool or instrument used to gain knowledge

2. A set of guiding principles for a particular science, philosophy, or discipline

An organon is something (such as a textbook) used to help someone acquire knowledge.  The “Organon” is a collection of six books by Greek philosopher Aristotle dealing with logic, all combining to create a definitive lecture still referenced today.

Example: During the Senate confirmation hearings, I kept reaching for my spiritual organon; hoping I could make sense of the relentless balderdash.

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Dictum One

As I gaze at my bibliophilic mass and scour through various references and guides, I’ve come upon a conundrum; a problem that supersedes the complexities of literary and moral universes; a quandary that has amazingly bypassed the slew of great minds that have slaved over hot pens, pencils and keyboards in the centuries before us.

How the hell did the people who composed the very first dictionary know they had it right the first time?!

That’s not a rhetorical question, dear readers! I need an answer! Our verbose lives depend on it!

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