Tag Archives: Sen. Ted Cruz

Book Blurb of the Week – March 6, 2021

“Ted Cruz: There is nothing more dangerous than a reckless asshole who thinks he is smarter than everyone else.”

John Boehner, former U.S. Congressman and Speaker of the House, on the dust jacket of his upcoming memoir, in which he also assails several other prominent Republicans, including former President Trump and Sen. Mitch McConnell.

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Worst Quotes of the Week – February 27, 2021

“I’ve got to say, Orlando is awesome!  It’s not as nice as Cancun, but it’s nice.”

Sen. Ted Cruz, at the 2021 Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC) in Orlando, Florida

“If you’re reading the room and you’re intelligent, you realize that Donald Trump is still the future of the Republican Party.  Those people who are being displaced by illegals, those people who are being swept aside by the Democrat Party, who has just flagrantly ignored them for decades, Donald Trump is all over that.”

Donald Trump Jr., on Fox News

“So, they had this whole big narrative going right after January 6, and that narrative has completely collapsed.  There was no insurrection, there was no coup.  As you mention, the only shot fired in the Capitol on January 6 was the shot fired by a policeman into Ashli Babbitt’s neck.  They tried very hard the New York Times was the chief culprit in making up the story about Brian Sicknick, now they knew that the story was a lie from the beginning, and the reason is that there is plenty of video of what was happening all over the Capitol.  And yet you will notice there never was any video of Brian Sicknick being hit on the head with a fire extinguisher.  The New York Times made that up, attributed to unnamed sources and never published a correction, they just later said, ‘well the story has been updated because there’s been new facts that have come in.’ The truth of it is they tried to construct a false narrative and now that that false narrative has imploded they’re moving to the, let’s call it the White supremacy narrative, which is equally bogus.”

Dinesh D’Souza, refuting that the January 6 Capitol Hill rioters were insurrectionists

Brian Sicknick was the Capitol Hill police officer who succumbed to injuries after the chaos, and Ashli Babbitt was the former U.S. Air Force servicewoman who was shot and killed as she tried to enter a hallway.

“We spent all day trying to locate the famous QAnon, which, in the end, we learned is not even a website.  If it’s out there, we could not find it.  Then, we checked Marjorie Taylor Greene’s Twitter feed because we have heard she traffics in disinformation, CNN told us, but nothing there.  Next, we called our many friends in the tight-knit intel community.  Could Vladimir Putin be putting this stuff out there?  The Proud Boys? Alex Jones?  Who is lying to America in ways that are certain to make us hate each other and certain to destroy our core institutions?  Well, none of the above, actually.  It wasn’t Marjorie Taylor Greene.  It was cable news.  It was politicians talking on TV.  They’re the ones spreading disinformation to Americans.  Maybe they are from QAnon.”

Tucker Carlson, claiming there is no evidence of a conspiracy group known as QAnon

On a side note, I’ve said before that Carlson resembles an adult film actor who went by the name T.T. Boy, c. 1990.

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The Texas state capital building in Austin

The memo was clear.  Everyone should make a concerted effort to get into the office, no matter what the weather is like.  That included winter storms.  It was the mid-1990s, and the manager of the department where I worked in a bank in downtown Dallas insisted that business was paramount.  This was seemingly light years before the Internet and telecommuting became dependable and functional.  And every time ice and snow paralyzed the Dallas / Fort Worth metropolitan area I managed to make it into work.  One week day I awoke to sleet falling outside of my apartment bedroom window; it was about 4 in the morning.  I knew the weather would only worsen, so I shut off my alarm clock and readied for work.  Travel time from my far North Dallas abode into downtown took almost 2 hours by navigating ice-laden streets.  When I arrived just before 8 a.m., I literally had to turn on the lights in the department.

When I went to work for an engineering company shortly after the turn of the century, I ended up back in downtown Dallas, laboring on a contract for a government agency.  I learned quickly the federal outfit had a phobia of snow and ice.  They’d literally shut down when snow began descending upon the city.  As contractors, my colleagues and I had to vacate the premises as well.  One afternoon a monstrous rainstorm attacked, and – in a faux frenzy – I asked loudly if we had to leave the building.  Rain, I declared, was just liquid snow.  No such luck.  We had to continue laboring over our strained keyboards.  Everyone laughed.

Last weekend Winter Storm Uri catapulted into North America from the Pacific, generating ice storms that blanketed the state of Texas this week and inducing an even more paralyzing effect: our power grid shut down.  Literally millions of people have lived without power (and in some cases, without water) since this past weekend.  As of this moment, most homes have their power back.  But a lack of water is now the problem.  Meanwhile, the number of deaths in Texas related to the event has risenDallas-Fort Worth International Airport led the world in the number of flight cancellations this week.

This has been a cataclysm of unimaginable proportions.  I have experienced a slew of serious weather events and witnessed plenty of incidents of government incompetence, but I have NEVER seen anything like this!

What has occurred here in Texas this week is a prime example of the ineptness of conservative ideology and intense deregulation.  Texas is an energy island; producing its own energy and relying upon no one else.  The exception is far West Texas, where El Paso and its immediate surrounding communities experienced the same weather event, yet had no power outages.  That strong sense of independence and individual reliability looks great in political campaigns, but doesn’t always turn out well in real life.  Since the mid-1990s, Texas has had the habit of electing the biggest morons to public office.  And they’ve come to dominate state government.  Texas conservatives have done more to protect gun rights than basic human rights.

Now many of those same conservatives who always espouse the concept of personal responsibility are pointing their gnarly fingers at everyone and everything except themselves and their own disjointed attitudes.  Even though President Joe Biden approved emergency relief for Texas, some Republicans are accusing him of indifference.  They somehow missed Ted Cruz running off to Cancun, México this week because his kids wanted to go.  Governor Greg Abbott has blamed green energy and the Green New Deal for the crisis.  Green energy, however, only makes up about 10% of energy sources in Texas, and the Green New Deal hasn’t even gone into effect yet.  But they’re liberal programs, so of course, Republicans consider them demonic and will trash their mere presence whenever they get the chance.  Abbott also blames the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) for mishandling the event, but still hasn’t looked in the mirror.

A ceiling fan in a Dallas apartment building sprouted icicles.

This debacle points to the vulnerability of modern societies that have come to rely upon optic fibers and wires; a weakness that would both appall and humor our hardy ancestors.  In March of 1888, a massive winter storm assaulted the Northeastern U.S., downing power lines and disabling even modest commutes in the region’s largest cities.  People in rural areas, however, lived through the storm and its effects without much trouble.  They were accustomed to such weather anyway and prepared for it.

Preparedness – the word of 2021.

Consider this irony.  Earlier on Thursday, the 18th, NASA was able to land a vehicle on Mars.  The endeavor cost millions of dollars and is an epic triumph in the name of science and technology.  But we can’t get power and water to millions of human beings here in Texas – on planet Earth – for several days.

That’s not just sad; it’s unbelievably outrageous.

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Best Quotes of the Week – January 30, 2021

“We see with our own eyes. We know it in our bones. It is time to act.”

President Joe Biden, upon signing executive orders to make the U.S. energy-independent and stop the use of fossil fuels to combat climate change

“I am happy to work with Republicans on this issue where there’s common ground, but you almost had me murdered 3 weeks ago, so you can sit this one out.  Happy to work with almost any other GOP that aren’t trying to get me killed.  In the meantime if you want to help, you can resign.”

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, criticizing Sen. Ted Cruz over the January 6 Capitol Hill riots

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Worst Quote of the Week

Ted_Cruz,_official_portrait,_113th_Congress

“I’m not going to engage in the back and forth and the attacks.  Several Democrats have demonstrated a willingness to attack me by name.  I’m not going to engage in that argument.  I’m going to stay focused on what I think Texans want me to stay focused on, which is the substance of the job.”

Sen. Ted Cruz, in response to a question from Dallas Morning News reporter Todd Gillman on whether or not he admired the late Sen. Joe McCarthy.

A simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’ couldn’t suffice?

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